Consultation on becoming an NHS Foundation Trust

1st February 2016 – 22nd April 2016

 

Why we want to be a foundation trust

In April 2011, we became a new, independent NHS Trust after separating from NHS Lincolnshire as part of the Government’s NHS reforms. This started our journey to becoming an NHS foundation trust which will give us greater freedom to shape our services in response to the needs of our patients and to improve services locally whilst still being part of the NHS.

NHS foundation trusts are not-for-profit, public benefit corporations but still part of the NHS. The reasons we want to become an NHS foundation trust are:
Local Accountability
People who use services and staff can have a real say in how the NHS foundation trust operates and influence its priorities through the membership and the Council of Governors.

Better Investment
Have more financial freedom than other NHS Trusts; for example an NHS foundation trust can reinvest a financial surplus to improve patient services.

Better Innovation
To have more freedoms and flexibilities so we can innovate and improve the quality of service.

As an NHS foundation trust, the way our organisation operates would change. Through the recruitment of members and the election and appointment of governors, local people and staff will have a say in the future of the services we provide, working closely with the Board of Directors.

As part of the application process to becoming an NHS Foundation Trust, a robust public consultation was undertaken in 2012. At that time we delivered services only in Lincolnshire and so asked the residents of Lincolnshire and our stakeholders for their views on our service priorities, the role and age of our members and proposals for Governance, elections and constituencies.

  • Membership is open to anyone aged 12 years or above, reflecting the age where individuals are deemed to be competent to give their own consent
  • Member constituency made up of all LCHS members represented by elected Governors.
  • Patient and carer constituency made up of people who access the services both inside and outside of Lincolnshire represented by elected Governors.
  • Staff constituency made up of staff members both clinical and non clinical represented by elected Governors.
  • Appointed Governors nominated from our key partner organisations.

LCHS now provides services outside of Lincolnshire and so we are consulting these residents on our foundation trust application and whether an outside of Lincolnshire element should be included within the public constituency. A public constituency is a group of voters who can elect a Governor to represent their area.

Link arrow icon  Click on this link to view the consultation Consultation on the Outside of Lincolnshire Constituency

What is the role of members and governors?

 

What do members do?

Members are vitally important to the trust as they provide a voice for the people of Lincolnshire and help shape the healthcare services provided. Members can get involved in any or all of the following ways:

LCHS now provides services outside of Lincolnshire and so we are consulting these residents on our foundation trust application and whether an outside of Lincolnshire element should be included within the public constituency. A public constituency is a group of voters who can elect a Governor to represent their area.

  • Receive our membership newsletter
  • Have a ‘vote’ in governor elections
  • Take part in research
  • Take part in surveys and questionnaires
  • Provide feedback on the Trust’s performance and service delivery
  • Have a say in service design or change
  • Stand to become an elected governor
  • Attend meetings such as the annual public meeting

You cannot become or remain a member of the NHS foundation trust if you have been:

  • Involved in a serious incident or an act of violence against any member of Lincolnshire Community Health Services staff or premises.
  • Openly demonstrate a prejudice towards certain people or sections of the community by means of race, gender, religion, sexual orientation or age.

Can I become a governor?

People who are members of the Trust and aged at least 18 can put themselves forward to become governors. Those wanting to become governors then need to go through an election process and secure votes from members.

What do governors do?

The Council of Governors meets to scrutinise the performance of the organisation and make recommendations to the Board of Directors. They hold the Board of Directors to account for the performance of the trust. They are ‘the public voice’ there to represent the interests of all those served by the trust.

Governors are also ambassadors for the trust and act as champions for community health care. Governors play an important role in promoting the work of the organisation and recruiting new members.

This is a voluntary role but expenses for things like travelling to meetings are claimable.